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Author Topic: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa  (Read 39581 times)

Offline fooorumi

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Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« on: September 02, 2012, 09:56:39 AM »
Hi all!

I guess it's time to introduce myself since I'm new here. I'm a 25-year old faithful Suzuki enthusiast from south of Finland with DIY-attitude. When building bike (or whatever else) I usually end up only to see it was more expensive, time consuming and lower quality than buying a commercial product but that's way to learn new. In the beginning of this project I didn't know a thing of hayabusa and especially nothing about turbocharging. Anyway after a year learning and struggling last month I finally completed building the engine and she gave me nice 320 rwhp (344 engine hp) with a slight clutch slip. One major source of information has been this forum so I want to thank you for sharing your experience.

As you know these bikes will never be ready and there's always something that can be done better. Well in Finland we (not so luckily) have this 5-month period when it's snowing and you can do nothing but build your bike. In addition to making some things on the motor better I'm going to at least paint the bike (DIY of course  :)) during the winter and maybe do some fairing update. But first something about what's been done during last year.

When I bought busa 14 months ago my idea first (and probably idea of many other turbo enthusiasts) was that it's going to be a real low-budget ride with just a basic kit. Fast, affordable and easy. However after 12 months of building what I have is a fully built motor with W/A-intercooler and secondaries (DIY), pistons, rods, tranny race cut, and a lot of things I never knew their existence. Now I've ridden the beast for a couple of months and it seems to hold together. And the money issue... Well money she likes a lot, like a proper woman do  :D I'll put some pictures soon but first there is one of the starting point when I bought this bike a year ago: Big and ugly with lots of unnecessary accessories!



Engine prep:


First I needed to find out what's inside the engine.. Opening the engine and reassembling it took some time and I found out handy to put the whole engine in a large plastic bag and zip tie it while not at garage. That way most of dirt and dust was easy to keep away


Every critical part in engine was checked and measured to ensure correct operation. Though the bike was old (1999) it was driven only 29 000 km and still in good shape. There was some minor wear at crank bearings and at one of the transmission fork but otherwise everything was ok. Crankshaft bearings was replaced and selected by haynes manual (stock clearances).


I had heard that while drag racing the second gear will wear fast and eventually slip off so I wanted undercut to transmission at the same time. Machining was made by a finnish drag racer and tuner Sami V. who knows hayabusa well.


Assembling the shaft was surprisingly busy as there were many similar parts and first I didn't know there's some oil holes to align and Haynes manual didn't say anything about that. It was maybe third try when I was sure it's assembled the right way. But hey not any problems yet  :mrgreen:


Sometimes my workshop was extended to the living room as in the picture where my cat is thinking are you serious?! Operation piston ring grinding


This is cyl head before cleaning.. carbonized as hell but there's already some paint stripper affecting..


Cleaned by paint stripper and brake cleaner + steel brush


After cleaning the head combustion chamber's and port's sharp edges was rounded and glass ball blasted to ensure cleanness and avoid detonation (comb. chamber)


Also new pistons (JE 8,5:1 turbo) was prepped by sanding sharp corners. According to JE pistons doesn't need any prep but I did some anyway, probably it won't make any harm and hopefully prevents detonation better  :shock:


I also chose to replace con rods due to higher weight of turbo pistons and to get some margin if more power is needed in the future. The original target was 300rwhp and for that I guess stock con rods would have been just fine.


Checking the deck height was pain in the ass cause the I wasn't sure about the right method.. Actually I tried to do this by several different methods but everytime I got different result. I ended up using 2mm aluminum plate under the barrel and two thin shims. That way I'm pretty confident to have enough space there and not lose valves


Here we are degreeing cams which was another interesting thing to do for the first time.. There are some different ways (and degree wheels) to do it and some of them are easier than other. Anyway after a couple of days trying I hope my cam lobe centers are now at 106 / 106. If you are nice maybe I post a better picture of my GF too  :mrgreen:


Just to keep me busy I also decided to extend the swingarm and powder coat all black. At this picture can also be seen my home made rear frame where I was going to mount radiator to get more room for the turbo but later decided to use original rear frame anyway.

More pictures coming soon...
« Last Edit: September 29, 2012, 02:00:02 AM by fooorumi »
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Offline Superzuki 2012

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2012, 07:56:16 PM »
Welcome to the forum, in a big way. Wow you're off to a good start. Please keep it coming.
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Offline fooorumi

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2012, 01:52:51 PM »
Thank you supersuzi for encouraging feedback! Nice to hear someone likes to follow this up  :mrgreen:

http://s1263.photobucket.com/albums/ii634/fooorumi_fin/?action=view&current=091e8478.mp4
At times I thought to put some videos that you don't get sleepy  :bike: It is her very last self aspirating moments before disassembling the engine and putting there some true air flow.

Mounting a turbo


Then there was time to pick a turbo. A small enough to fit in easily and powerful enough to make 300hp I thought. (mitsu TD04)


Then luckily I was patient enough, studied and realized I actually need a bigger turbo. I bought a second hand TD05-Big and this time I was sure I have right tool for the job.


Well, I was wrong as usually. Very soon there was a brand new GT3071R at the garage waiting for installation. As we don't (yet) have much hayabusas with big turbos in Finland my friends laughed their ass off as they realized I was gonna use bigger turbo they have in their 200SX nismos  :lol: Anyway I was confident that this will be just fine and started fabricating the manifold.


I began with the manifold by taking measures and making drawings (dxf-files) to get the flanges laser-cutted. It is pretty cheap so I don't see a reason to machine flanges. Btw if anyone is interested I can share the files and then you're free to cut your own flanges  :wink: Then the next step was to find a place for turbo and weld a temporary bar to make a jig. After that it is easier to work with the manifold at your workshop desk.


I decided to combine cyl 1 & 4 and 2 & 3 to avoid reverse flow to cylinder caused by valve overlap. Here are the first two pipes coming together..


After a couple of hours I had found a route for each pipe and it was time to begin welding. Just because all want their manifold to be welded by tig I wanted to be different and used MIG instead  :hys: Alright it was also the fact that I didn' t have access to tig anymore and didn't want to rent one...


Here is finally welded exhaust manifold blasted with aluminium oxide. Note the bung for mounting a pressure gauge. After blasting I face grinded flanges and prepared the manifold for painting


This is the way to do it if you're lazy as I just duct tape the paint can in the gun and spray  :mrgreen: The coating isn't just black paint but a ceramic coating which helps to keep heat inside. Using this stuff is also the reason I needed to use aluminum oxide to clean the surface


Finally complete manifold ready to install.


At where it belongs


Here's an overview of the bike with stretched swing and powder coated frame and wheels. K&N might give someone an idea that there might be some additional power inside  :)

to be continued with the plenum next time...
« Last Edit: September 03, 2012, 01:56:02 PM by fooorumi »
wetracingcrew

Offline Superzuki 2012

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2012, 08:48:49 PM »
This is amazing!
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Offline Got-Busa?

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2012, 12:17:35 AM »
Very nice job and nice build! :thumb:

I always loved the Euro Black/Red early color BUSA's and with the Gold wheels it looks awesome..  :beechug:
CLICK-->  *Got-Busa's "STREET BIKE"-project* <--CLICK
"WILMINGTON MILE" - 212.7 MPH!
"HOUSTON HALF MILE" - 196.8 MPH!
"TEXAS MILE" -182.265 MPH stock --204.468 MPH "Brock's Performance" basic mods -- 227.2 MPH "RCC TURBO" low boost/half naked!

Offline gsx-rboy750

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #5 on: September 04, 2012, 02:24:58 PM »
MORE MORE MORE. Super nice header. Its funny the size turbos you can use compared to the car guys. I have to remind them that motorcycle spin twice the RPMs normally. Twice the exhaust flow.
Really want to seethe pics of your manifold!

Offline Pete

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #6 on: September 04, 2012, 04:52:19 PM »
Truly an amazing DIY build - I love the ceramic coating - have you got any details on the product for us?

What are you doing for an oil return from the turbo? I just re-made a scavenge pump for mine which screws directly into the engine cover. Beinterested to see how you've done yours.

Offline fooorumi

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #7 on: September 05, 2012, 11:05:43 AM »
Truly an amazing DIY build - I love the ceramic coating - have you got any details on the product for us?

What are you doing for an oil return from the turbo? I just re-made a scavenge pump for mine which screws directly into the engine cover. Beinterested to see how you've done yours.

Thank you! Well here's the product info for ceramic coating:  :mrgreen:
http://www.martelius.com/index.php?module=ekauppa&type=2&product=TL-BHK250

Basically it's a solvent based high-end coating with the best insulation capabilities on the market. Will stand 1100C -degrees (2012 F) without cracking or scaling. Also oil doesn't burn into it and it does harden without using an oven but just running the engine warm. In the small print there's a lot detailed information about preparation but basically the part needs to be cleaned by aluminium oxide or fine sand blasting, wiping with solvent and pre-heated before spraying.


For the oil drain in my case turbo oil return pump is not needed as I placed the turbo well above oil level (see the picture). For turbo oil drain I made a pipe like this of steel, cost - zero  :mrgreen: (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Turbo-Oil-Drain-Return-Pipe-Kit-Garrett-BB-GT25-GT28-GT30-GT35-GT3076R-GT3582R-/180962166842?pt=Motors_Car_Truck_Parts_Accessories&hash=item2a222f883a&vxp=mtr#ht_1185wt_1163)



Then I used inner diameter 16mm (5/8") oil proof hose to connect turbo and oil sump. A proper way to go through the sump wall (which I'll do during winter) is to weld a bung to the sump but at the time there was a bit hurry and I didn't have access to tig any more so I drilled a hole (actually two, the first I made accidentally at the wrong side :x) and put there 3/4" hex nipple + a nut inside the sump (locked by thread lock and wire). In this nipple I welded 90-degree steel curve (not yet in the pictures) and attached oil hose to it. Not much pro but it's been good for 1000 miles already  :bike:

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Offline moparict

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #8 on: September 05, 2012, 11:25:33 AM »
Love'n the parts in the house and the DIY attitude!!!  Stay strong and fight the good fight!! :tu:

Offline Pete

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2012, 11:38:25 AM »
Nothing wrong with using that bulkhead fitting - that's what they are made for.

You did well to get that big turbo high enough to gravity-drain :thumb:

That coating isn't cheap - 80 for les than half a pint! Did you use the whole pot on your headers?

Offline mysticblu999

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2012, 11:54:47 AM »
Looks like you are doing great. You got the turbo high. Your welding looks great. How bout those pics of the GF? :)

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Offline fooorumi

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #11 on: September 05, 2012, 12:11:51 PM »
Nothing wrong with using that bulkhead fitting - that's what they are made for.

You did well to get that big turbo high enough to gravity-drain :thumb:

That coating isn't cheap - 80 for les than half a pint! Did you use the whole pot on your headers?

To be accurate it was 80 euros which equals 63 or 100 USD at the moment. But since my header is not RST some coating is needed and I think the price isn't that bad. Actually the coating's cost was the same as header material's (15 pcs of 90 degree curves and a piece of straight pipe). Also if I remember right I only used half of the bottle so I can sell the rest  8)


exhaust manifold monster - header before assembling

Looks like you are doing great. You got the turbo high. Your welding looks great. How bout those pics of the GF? :)

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It is autumn coming and soon there's no use for bikinis but let's see what I can do  :)
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Offline Lumpasaurus

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Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #12 on: September 05, 2012, 07:16:25 PM »
Great project.  Always like it more when people build it instead of buying it. You going to make an intercooled plenum next?  Very nice work. 

Offline fooorumi

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #13 on: September 06, 2012, 02:35:02 PM »
Air/water intercooler / plenum:


I began with the intercooler by taking measures of the space available and then I bought the biggest core I thought would fit into it. Because of the high price of sparco etc. cores I decided to try china cooler and ordered one from Ebay.


The first thing was to cut intercooler inlet and outlet away to save space. I left there half inch lip before the core to protect it while welding.


The next step was to figure out plenum shape. Because of the core size and limited space under the tank I didn't come up with too many ideas how to do it. I then used cardboard and duct tape to test if my design fits under the tank. One big problem was that the tank gets quickly narrow at front and IC-core is pretty wide. Actually I had to form the tank a little bit with a hammer and put small spacers under the tank bolts.


This isn't really necessary but then I made a 3D-model of the plenum / IC to get sheet metal drawings for parts that fit perfectly. Then accord to drawings I built a cardboard model of the plenum and double-checked that everything fits well.


I also designed new injector bungs to get injectors as low as possible cause there is very little space under the tank (measures in millimeters..)


Here are some new billet parts I subcontracted according to my drawings as I don't have a lathe or any other machinery currently.


and here are some water cut sheet metal aluminium parts for the plenum.


Even tho not the original idea I had to cut one of the edges as it would have been hard to angle otherwise.


Here is the welded plenum. As I'm lazy in some things I don't have motivation to polish it up as it will stay under the tank  :)


At rear there's place for engine temp sensor and MAP-sensor (McXpress-controller for extra injectors)


It begins to be pretty packed under the tank  :) Bosch IC-pump is behind cyl 2 and aeromotive fuel pressure regulator under the original fuel rail. I don't know if there's any affect in keeping fuel cool and constant temperature but I wrapped fuel lines with aluminium foil and hold it in place by plastic wire holder.


My first idea was to cool intercooler water by radiator located at the rear frame but I wasn't sure if it will be efficient enough so I bought a second-hand hayabusa radiator which I cut in half to fit it in front of the bike.


IC-radiator coming together


And here's some plumbing!! Everything except the filter fits inside the fairings. I also insulated the up-pipe to help keep charge air cool. In case you're wondering bout wastegate signal line there's a solenoid valve between to control boost electrically. This way boost rise can be controlled by RPM's and power delivery is smooth


Not a bikini pic but here you are the GF finally, cutting my electricity  :mrgreen:
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Offline Lumpasaurus

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Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #14 on: September 06, 2012, 03:28:48 PM »
Super bad ass job on the plenum.   Love the injector bungs.

Offline STREETDRAG

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #15 on: September 06, 2012, 03:30:53 PM »
Man awesome detail thanks for sharing..

Offline moparict

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #16 on: September 06, 2012, 05:12:18 PM »
I have a quick question.  How are you going to keep the plenum attached to the motor?  Once it builds boost, it will try and lift the plenum.

Offline Pete

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #17 on: September 07, 2012, 12:39:35 AM »
Impressive work - puts some commercial effrts to shame. I like the design first, cut later approach. I did the same because mine's a *lot* tighter.

Offline fooorumi

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #18 on: September 07, 2012, 05:31:09 AM »
I have a quick question.  How are you going to keep the plenum attached to the motor?  Once it builds boost, it will try and lift the plenum.

I fabricated steel brackets which are attached to aluminium plates on both sides of the plenum and then they're anchored to the M6-bolts in the frame. I don't have any pics but they are pretty basic anyway as they're just angled iron bars with holes for the bolts.


Continuing with the exhaust the right flange in the pic was cut by garrett measures and the left one by own measures. The difference is that in my version 3-inch pipe fits into hole nicely when you just squeeze it.. This way it is pretty easy to make a straight 3" exhaust pipe. Because of the differences in the flange shape some places needed grinding to avoid steep edge


However, later I decided to put there a muffler to get the bike more quiet and it was easier to use 2,5" pipe all the way. Fitting 3" pipe under fairing seemed to be impossible. So after all there was no point of using that strange flange but if someone is interested in it I have drawing for this also. As can be seen in the picture I also had to move the wastegate actuator to this side cause there was no room at the other side. 


As you can see it's been good old MIG again melting metal  :mrgreen: I wish I had money to buy that AC/DC tig finally...


s(low) I go.. But it still can be ridden on the road even with my (or someone else's) GF as suspension spring preloads are pretty high  :mrgreen: Good thing is that the muffler is the lowest point and oil sump comes after that.. Even though the muffler looks small it is practically straight open pipe and has almost 2,5" inner diameter


Almost ready to fire it up.. Still needs fluids inside

http://s1263.photobucket.com/albums/ii634/fooorumi_fin/?action=view&current=a879a42f.mp4
I wanted to publish this video also as accidentally I found a thread about priming the engine. I never thought that it would be necessary to do that but heard that some people have pretty much destroyed their new built engine with no priming. This way you can be sure that when you finally crank it up there will be oil pressure instantly. It's not a big job so whether needed or not I recommend do it every time reassembling the engine. (the thing you should be watching on the video is how oil pressure light act while turning the oil pump :wink:)


Here's the power curve which is pretty straight line because of the boost control solenoid valve. It's hard to see in the picture but boost rises little by little. Because of this the bike is pretty easy to drive as power comes smoothly. After 10k clutch began to slip but I decided to let it be as summer is about to end and I wanted riding asap. The final result was 320rwhp @1 bar. I've read that stock clutch should hold pretty well even with 3 strong APE springs. I used 6 of them and original back-torque mechanism but still it was slipping. Probably the cause is that I didn't realize to measure stack height (only plates one by one) and it might be a little too small. Or if you have any ideas more likely please tell me  :wink:
« Last Edit: September 25, 2012, 09:00:43 AM by fooorumi »
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Offline fooorumi

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #19 on: September 28, 2012, 05:43:45 PM »
http://s1263.photobucket.com/albums/ii634/fooorumi_fin/?action=view&current=small_zpsc71c8437.mp4

Here's a video showing how she looks with her clothes on as I actually didn't take ANY pictures of complete bike with fairings (+In the end bike went off, the comedy part)  :mrgreen: I also had in mind to record some pulls with gopro-helmet cam but I kind of forgot it and last week I ended the insurance. Now there's again at least 6 months time to build busa better. Btw how long is Your riding season?? Maybe I should move to California or some other hotter place...



Traditionally disassembling the bike began by ripping off tire parts around the rear axle..  :mrgreen: This time I used the tire more completely than ever, as almost the hole surface of the tire was jammed around the axle and it took around 45 minutes to get all off. This happened after a couple 2nd gear accelerating burnouts against front brake when there was speed about 35 mph. Not much but after the tire exploded the bike went like a wounded dog and it was job to even get it back to garage!
« Last Edit: September 28, 2012, 05:46:16 PM by fooorumi »
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Offline fooorumi

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #20 on: February 16, 2013, 02:48:44 AM »
Hi all

As usually the winter has been cold and depressing and it's not a lot that I have done to busa yet. By experience I can say it needs those first sights of spring and sun before project really starts to go forward. However some little progress can be seen as the lock-up clutch is now coming (from the states, thanks Doug) so I hope next time in dyno we can raise the boost a little. Last time we had to run original settings by the McXpress box and still the clutch was slipping at 9800 revs.

To update the look of the bike I decided to go with the gen2-fairing which I bought from China.



When trying the fairing it looked to me that the swingarm (which is around 4 inches streched) was now a little too short.. It's not a big issue but it disturbs me so a new 7" longer arm with under brace is now being fabricated. These was also available for reasonable price in the states so I didn't manufacture it myself which is uptypical  :)



I'm still considering the color of the bike.. Matt black is of course the most mean and looks always the best but I still want something different. I don't want any disturbing rainbow coloring like all-show bikes has but something controlled with airbrushed details and so. At the moment I think maybe some black, red, maybe candy detail and skulls, lets see what I come up with  :mrgreen:
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Offline Mike-Nightrider

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #21 on: February 16, 2013, 06:16:15 AM »
Great work  :tu:
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Offline yetifed

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #22 on: March 17, 2013, 09:52:23 PM »
Looks good, Nice Job.
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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #23 on: March 19, 2013, 09:15:10 PM »
Impressive! :tu:
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Offline mysticblu999

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Re: Just another try to build a low cost diy turbo busa
« Reply #24 on: March 19, 2013, 10:26:00 PM »
That thing is looking good. So how about the bikini pic? :D

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2007 Hayabusa Super Ultra (in progress)    
2013 Hayabusa Limited (on order)
2008 RM250 (for jumping stuff)


Super Ultra build thread http://www.suzukihayabusa.org/forum/index.php?topic=160376.new#new